Mysteries of color daily laidBy the great sun in light and shade,And, sweet varieties of chance,And the mystic seasons’ dance,And thief-like step of liberal hoursWhich thawed the snow-drift into flowers.
from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Monadnoc”

Mysteries of color daily laid
By the great sun in light and shade,
And, sweet varieties of chance,
And the mystic seasons’ dance,
And thief-like step of liberal hours
Which thawed the snow-drift into flowers.

from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Monadnoc”

Old-timey ice cream machine! The chocolate ice cream tasted like a frosty.

Old-timey ice cream machine! The chocolate ice cream tasted like a frosty.

Classic cars on the 4th of July

Classic cars on the 4th of July

explore-blog:


When André was 12, he was already over 6 feet tall and weighed 240 pounds. He was too big to fit on the local school bus and his family didn’t have the money to buy a car that could deal with his weight if it drove him to and from school.
Samuel Beckett, Nobel Prize winner (literature) and esteemed playwright, probably most noted for Waiting for Godot, bought some land in 1953 near a hamlet around forty miles northeast of Paris and built a cottage for himself with the help of some locals. One of the locals that helped him build the cottage was a Bulgarian-born farmer named Boris Rousimoff, who Beckett befriended and would sometimes play cards with. As you might’ve been able to guess, Rousimoff’s son was André the Giant, and when Beckett found out that Rousimoff was having trouble getting his son to school, Beckett offered to drive André to school in his truck — a vehicle that could fit André — to repay Rousimoff for helping to build Beckett’s cottage. Adorably, when André recounted the drives with Beckett, he revealed they rarely talked about anything other than cricket.

Who knew

explore-blog:

When André was 12, he was already over 6 feet tall and weighed 240 pounds. He was too big to fit on the local school bus and his family didn’t have the money to buy a car that could deal with his weight if it drove him to and from school.

Samuel Beckett, Nobel Prize winner (literature) and esteemed playwright, probably most noted for Waiting for Godot, bought some land in 1953 near a hamlet around forty miles northeast of Paris and built a cottage for himself with the help of some locals. One of the locals that helped him build the cottage was a Bulgarian-born farmer named Boris Rousimoff, who Beckett befriended and would sometimes play cards with. As you might’ve been able to guess, Rousimoff’s son was André the Giant, and when Beckett found out that Rousimoff was having trouble getting his son to school, Beckett offered to drive André to school in his truck — a vehicle that could fit André — to repay Rousimoff for helping to build Beckett’s cottage. Adorably, when André recounted the drives with Beckett, he revealed they rarely talked about anything other than cricket.

Who knew

Reblogged from Cam M. Roberts

illustrativo:

A new series of photo-manipulation combining parts of houses on trees.


The trees are from New Hampshire and the other elements like windows are from different locations on Boston.
www.dbarreto.com

If you want to follow my process and more of my work follow me on my FBpage : here

These are so cool! 

Reblogged from illustrativo
lepasau-dela:

Samuel Beckett, Not I
performed by Billie Whitelaw (1973).

Billie Whitelaw is amazing. So much dedication to that role.

lepasau-dela:

Samuel Beckett, Not I

performed by Billie Whitelaw (1973).

Billie Whitelaw is amazing. So much dedication to that role.

Reblogged from Cam M. Roberts

underthevastblueseas:

These eels spend their lives swaying gracefully to and fro with their heads up in the water and their tails in their sandy burrows. Several hundred fish live together in a colony, or “garden,” looking like evenly spaced plants blowing in the breeze. Garden eels are much slimmer than their close relatives, the conger eels. They are only about in (14 mm) in diameter and have very small pectoral fins. The spotted garden eel usually has two large dark spots behind the head as well as many tiny ones all over the body. It has an upturned mouth that is designed to pick tiny planktonic animals from the water as the current flows by. Colonies of these eels occur only on sandy slopes that are exposed to currents but sheltered from waves. When danger threatens, the eels sink back down into their burrows, using their tails as an anchor until only their small heads and eyes are visible. They are very difficult to photograph underwater because they are able to detect the vibrations from a scuba diver’s air bubbles and will disappear when they are approached.

Spotted garden eels stay in their burrows even when spawning. Neighboring males and females reach across and entwine their bodies before releasing eggs and sperm. Mixed colonies of spotted and whitespotted garden eels sometimes occur.

via: Oceana

 

Most colonies are ruled by fabulous sea-witches

judhudson:

awkward-elevator:

Swedish Chef Ramsay

Oh god, I’m in tears, specially the last one.

YES this is amazing

Reblogged from Fat Heffalump
whalessinging:

Goblin shark

Terrifying

whalessinging:

Goblin shark

Terrifying

Reblogged from Cam M. Roberts